10 Research Tips

1. The LibGuide “La beauté est dans la rue” is an excellent place to begin your research.

2. The Situationist International Anthology (available under the “Situationism” tab on the LibGuide) is a crucial source of information on the SI, psychogeography, and the dérive. (Remember that you will need to demonstrate that at least five sources from this anthology were consulted.)

3. Remember to color code your contributions to the annotated bibliography.

4. Document every source that you consult. It’s very frustrating to forget where you found a memorable bit of information.

5. Skim meaningfully. You cannot read everything. So, in true situationist style, let your desires guide you through the data web that you are researching.

6. Read further when information seems important. Again — you do not need to read everything. You only need to read effectively.

7. Place cut-and-pasted information in quotation marks. In the glorious frenzy of research, it’s easy to confuse what language belongs to you and to someone else without those little inverted commas. Also, plagiarism.

8. Take notes. The more specific and precise your notes, the better. When applicable, make sure to record page numbers.

9. Document connections across your notes. If two texts seem related, record your observation. (A day later you likely won’t remember it.)

Dérive Project Groups

***5th Hour***

1.

Katherine
Xanthe
Tim
Jack
Gloria

2.

Alex
Alice
Martin
Emma
Ana
Kate

3.

Raine
Solomia
Tri
Ethan
Grace

***7th Hour***

1.

Harmen
Sarah
William
Sam Li
Betsy
Jessica

2.

Macheila
Sammy
Anika
Adam
Bella
Krishna

3.

Lia
Abraham
Albert
Nathalie
Cedric
Olivia

4.

Dante
Ayat
Loewy
Bridget
Nishant
Arjun

***8th Hour***

1.

Lili
Christelle
Aidan
Annemily
Matt
Alex SL

2.

Irina
Kevin
Sarah
Annette
DJ
Lawrence

3.

Samantha
Izzy
Tori
Robert
Charlie
Tina

4.

Hannah
Max
Alex H.
Ayah
Nina
Asante

Dérive Project: Phase 1 (Research)

RESEARCH:

For Phase 1 of the Dérive Project, you and your small group should research the central ideas and practices constellated around the concept of the dérive. To get started, you might focus on “Situationism,” “psychogeography,” and (of course) “the dérive.”

  • What do these terms refer to? What is their history? How would you paraphrase them?
  • What concrete examples of them can you find?
  • Did you find any noteworthy examples of psychogeographical maps?
  • How does one conduct a psychogeographical analysis?
  • What dérives have been executed in the past?
  • What other major concepts and/or practices are associated with situationism, psychogeography, or the dérive?
  • How do these concepts and practices connect with your previous knowledge?
  • In your research, what information surprised you?

During this initial phase, please consult the LibGuide “La beauté est dans la rue.” There, you will have access to electronic reference sources, online documents, videos, and other materials that will facilitate the research process and furnish springboards for launching into deeper and/or more expansive investigations. Within this web of sources, the most important resource is the Situationist International Anthology (available online under the “Situationism” tab). All groups are required to demonstrate that no fewer than five (5) sources from this anthology were consulted for this research project.

Physical books recommended on the LibGuide will be held on reserve in the Uni library.

As a group, use GoogleDocs to construct an annotated bibliography of your collective knowledge. Citations should follow MLA conventions. To benefit your group, annotations should be no less than 80 words in length and should clearly highlight the most important information in the source. (For the Situationist International Anthology, you should create citations for individual articles, rather than a single citation for the entire book.) Likewise, please color code bibliographic entries, so that I can visually track who made which contributions.

Keep this GoogleDoc. Your group will submit its annotated bibliography on 4/4, the day of presentations. Further, your group will also need to submit the bibliography in a collective portfolio at the end of the project.

PRESENTATION:

Your preliminary research culminates in a 10-minute group presentation that should clearly and efficiently convey the highlights of your findings. The presentation’s goal is to deepen the entire class’ knowledge of the dérive and its contexts.

  • What did your group learn about the dérive?
  • What can you explain that will enrich your classmates’ knowledge of this practice?
  • What is basic knowledge — information most groups likely encountered?
  • What unique information — more than basic knowledge — did you discover?

Please use GoogleDocs to plan your presentation. Ideally, the presentation should exhibit some coherence, rather than offer a catalogue of observations. As for the annotated bibliography, each group member should color code their contributions to the presentation’s organization, and everyone in the group should equitably contribute.

When your group submits its annotated bibliography, please also submit the color-coded GoogleDoc that evidences a collaborative effort to organize the group presentation.

Presentations will be held in class on 4/4.